Security Paper Questions

Questions & Answers

  • Q: What is security paper used for?

    A:

    Security paper is a paper used to identify or authenticate a document as original or help to prevent fraud or alteration of the original information printed on a document.

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  • Q: What is a Pantograph VOID?

    A:

    In security printing, void pantograph refers to a method of making copy-evident and tamper-resistant patterns in the background of a document. Normally these are invisible to the eye but become obvious when the document is photocopied. Typically, they spell out "void", "copy", "invalid" or some other indicator message.  Void pantographs work by exploiting the limitations and features of copy equipment.  There are many patents in use for this technology, each works slightly different.   

     

     

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  • Q: Why do some photo copiers show the "void" message and others do not?

    A:

    The reason "Hidden Message Technology" works on some copiers and not others are the way the various patented processes for printing this technology work on different machines. The words are hidden in the background. If you look at the background with a magnifying glass, you will see the hidden words. When the light from the copier hits the background, the change in the background around the hidden words causes the words to appear. As copier technology has improved, some copiers look past the changes in the background. For example, you can take a digital photo of the sheet and you will now have a copy without any of the hidden words showing. Ever improving copier technology is just one of the reasons layer on layer security should be used to truly protect a document.

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  • Q: How does the erasure protection feature work?

    A:

    When trying to remove information written on a document using an ink eraser, a small amount of the background color is removed with the ink. Thus, it becomes obvious that a change was made to the document because the color is removed or smudged.

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  • Q: What is a True Watermark?

    A:

    A true watermark is an image or pattern in paper that appears as various shades of lightness or darkness when viewed with a light source behind the paper.  The pattern is visible because of the density variations in the paper.  

    This feature is used to authenticate an original sheet and cannot be scanned or copied.

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  • Q: What is an Artificial Water?

    A:

    An artificial watermark is a pattern printed on a document with transparent or  white ink. To view the water mark image tilt the document at a 45 degree angle toward a light source .  

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  • Q: What is a warning band and what does it do?

    A:

    A warning band is an area of the document that describes the security features present in the paper.

    The warning band lets anyone handling the document know what to look for to verify the authenticity of the document.  If the warning band lists features that can’t be identified, the receiver will know the document is not an original or may have been altered.  It will do no good to load a document with security features if the recipient of the document isn’t aware of what security features are integrated into the document.

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  • Q: What is coin Reactive ink?

    A:

    Coin reactive inks are white or clear and become visible when scratched with a coin, paperclip, keys, etc. This feature is used to authenticate an original sheet and cannot be scanned or copied.

     

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  • Q: What is Thermochromic Ink?

    A:

    Thermochromic inks react to changes in temperature. If you touch or blow on an image printed in this ink it will change color or disappear. The image will reappear after it cools. Thermochromic ink’s reaction to temperature changes cannot be replicated on a color copier or laser printer.

     

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